The Telegraph reposted its positive reviews of The Phantom Menace and Attack of the Clones

thetelegraph

The Telegraph reposted its original positive reviews of The Phantom Menace and Attack of the Clones, and its original negative review of Revenge of the Sith.


“Yet The Phantom Menace is probably one of the most deliriously inventive films to have appeared in years: it displays all of George Lucas’s uncommon magic, a wide-eyed genius for adventure narrative that is beyond any ordinary capacity for wonder, and in many respects the latest episode proves itself to be a more finished movie than any of the others. It is daring and beautiful, terrifying and pompous – and that’s just the title sequence.” Click here to read the whole review of The Phantom Menace.


“But, for most of us, Attack of the Clones is indeed a pleasant surprise. It’s fine. It’s just about what we want it to be, it’s certainly an improvement on the last chapter, and it leaves us, if not exactly quivering with anticipation for Episode III, then at least prepared to believe that Anakin Skywalker’s conversion to the Dark Side just might make that the really good one. ” Click here to read the whole review of Attack of the Clones.


Click here to read the review of Revenge of the Sith.

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Temuera Morrison regrets not having had his hair cut for Attack of the Clones

jango

From au.StarWars.com;

“[au.StarWars.com:] YOU WEAR A PRETTY ICONIC COSTUME IN [ATTACK OF THE CLONES] – THE MANDALORIAN ARMOUR. DID YOU GET FITTED UP FOR THAT?

[Temuera Morrison:] They got me in and fitted me up, put all that stuff on it, looked at it, and I was just going along with the flow. I liked how I looked, but if I could go back I would’ve taken my hair back a little bit more, added a few more scars, hardened him up a bit. My hair was still too long. The problem was I was doing a television movie, Ihaka: Blunt Instrument, working with Rebecca Gibney in Sydney, so I had to keep my hair like that because there were still some scenes to finish off on the show, and that annoyed me because I really needed to do something. […]

IS IT DIFFICULT TO SEE OUT OF THE JANGO FETT HELMET?

You couldn’t see anything! I remember filming with that mask on, one of the first days in the studio, standing there with no guns, just my fingers pointed out. I thought they could’ve got me some toy guns, but I didn’t even have that, would you believe! I’m standing there right, and can’t see or hear anything because I was fogged up from my breathing, and I’m the idiot standing there doing nothing while they’re yelling out “Action!” Probably three or four times, then I see someone waving and I thought “Yes, I am the idiot.” [laughs] But then you start getting into it and moving about.

HOW WAS GEORGE LUCAS LIKE TO WORK WITH?

George was very nice, very cordial, very nice, very relaxed. He was wonderful. [The movie’s] just big though, hey. You just gotta settle in quick, that’s the challenge. Because when you get there you’re quite in awe. Walking into those Star Wars scenes on your first day, you really feel the enormity of it so you’ve got to work on relaxing – especially working with people like Ewan [McGregor, Obi-Wan Kenobi] who’d already done a bit of Star Wars stuff before me – they were all relaxed.

HOW WAS IT WORKING OPPOSITE EWAN MCGREGOR?

Fantastic, yeah. He was very calm, but he was playing a Jedi, so he wasn’t doing much. Jedi don’t do much – they just keep still under that cape and move their eyebrows every now and then if you’re lucky – get some eyebrow acting in [laughs].”

Temuera Morrison would be ‘very happy’ to play Clone Captain Rex

morrison_rex

From au.StarWars.com:

“[au.StarWars.com:] IT MUST BE PRETTY COOL TO THINK, “I PLAYED BOBA FETT’S DAD”. PLUS YOUR VOICE GETS TO LIVE ON AS BOBA FETT, AND YOUR FACE WAS USED FOR ALL OF THE CLONES!

[Temuera Morrison:] They’re all in my Jango Fett line – I have clones lining up. Then, of course, there’s Captain Rex, who’s an iconic character. I’ve also voiced various games. What’ll make me really happy is if I get the phone call asking me to play another character – an older Captain Rex or something. I want to pop in on one of these new ones, that would be great. Suggest it to them for me! Let’s get on to it!”

 

Psychotherapist praises the ‘realistic’ romance between Padmé and Anakin

padme_anakin

From Time Out:

“We all know that relationships are hard work in real-life and that love is nothing like the movies. But which screen romances are the worst offenders? And can falling for their charms really do any harm? We asked a team of psychologists, therapists and dating coaches which movies have the most unhealthy attitudes to love. […]

A few [romantic movies] the experts like: […]

Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith

‘If you want to look on the dark side, nothing demonstrates a dysfunctional relationship better than Padmé Amidala and Anakin Skywalker. It didn’t end happily, but it is realistic. She was older, he was younger and infatuated. Even if you forget the age difference, there were so many signs that the relationship was toxic. A good relationship is based on communication, shared values and respect. They failed to communicate effectively. Rather than dealing with it, problems were ignored.’

Gurpreet Singh [Relate counsellor and psychotherapist]”

The Last Jedi director was impressed by the theory that Snoke is Anakin’s pear

snoke_pear

From Comicbook.com:

“Recently, Yahoo! had a chance to chat with director Rian Johnson and John Boyega about their favorite Snoke theories. When Johnson was questioned about his go-to conspiracy, the director quickly admitted that his favorite Snoke take comes from one fruit-obsessed fan.

“Somebody – I think this is more of a joke than a theory. I don’t know who it was. They had a theory on who Snoke was. In Attack on the Clones, when Anakin is slicing the pear for Padme before he floats it over to her, they took a freeze frame of that and then put it side-by-side with the slice in Snoke’s head,” Johnson explained.

“They said he is the evolution of that pear, and I was like, ‘That’s pretty good. I wish I had thought of that.’””

You can watch the video at Yahoo!.

Portman and McGregor were reportedly “wounded” by Episodes I and II reviews (UPDATE : or maybe not)

portman_mcgregor

From J. W. Rinzler Blog:

”   […] Back on set, whenever George asked Jimmy Smits (Bail Organa) to modify his performance or alter an action, Smits would reply, “Yes, sir.” Often when George asked Christensen or McGregor, they would reply, “Yeah, yeah, yeah.”
They weren’t disrespectful, but they weren’t necessarily buying it either. They were going along with it.
Back on the Original Trilogy, Mark Hamill (Luke Skywalker), Harrison Ford (Han Solo), and Carrie Fisher (Princess Leia) had understood instinctively where Lucas was coming from, though he was famously uncommunicative. It was nothing personal. As many know, “Faster” and/or “More intense,” was what Lucas often requested of his actors.
Part of his general reticence on any set was due to the fact that he simply didn’t want to be there. Lucas had told Roger Christian back in 1976, set decorator on Star Wars, that each day he woke up with a metaphorical sack of large stones on his back and spent the day struggling to remove them, painfully, one by one. On set for Episode III, I overheard George asking himself one morning, “Why am I putting myself through this again?”
In 1978, three crewmembers got into a post-film analysis of their ex-boss, concluding that he took too much on himself and stressed himself out unnecessarily. They also thought he often put his trust in the wrong people. I’ve read similar complaints about similar visionaries. Evidently, when you’re hounded by success, it often becomes difficult to tell who has your best interests at heart, particularly given that many folks may have already told you things that didn’t turn out to be true, or said that something wouldn’t work that did turn out to work, and vice versa, etc., etc. It’s a difficult position to be in.
Despite his directorial shorthand and his on-set suffering, Lucas, Ford, Fisher, and Hamill worked well together on the Original Trilogy and remained friends afterward. Lucas seemed particularly close with Fisher.
It didn’t help that Portman and McGregor had been wounded by negative reviews of the first two prequels, making this last one harder for them. In fact when I was given the greenlight to talk to McGregor on set, I went over to introduce myself and before I’d said two words, he shouted in a loud and annoyed voice, “Well, I’ll just let you know then!”
It was a tad awkward. Crew would tell me that on Episode I McGregor had been enthusiastic and kind, helping to move chairs for the next setup. But he’d changed. Rick told me that the actor was frustrated, and on an “emotional rollercoaster.”
He and Portman were never ready to be interviewed (instead I relied on EPKs). […]”


UPDATE!

J. W. Rinzler altered his article, which now says: “It didn’t help that Portman and McGregor may have been wounded by negative reviews of the first two prequels, making this last one harder for them.”

He removed the anecdotes about McGregor’s behavior, and softened another part where he describes Christensen expressing his lack of understanding of Lucas’ vision of Anakin at one point.


J. W. Rinzler used to be a writer and editor at Lucas Licensing. He wrote The Making of Star Wars Revenge of the SithThe Art of Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith,  and many other behind-the-scenes books.