George Lucas wanted Darth Talon to corrupt Han and Leia’s son in Episode VII

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Lucasfilm Development Exec Pablo Hidalgo shared more information about George Lucas’ treatments for the third Star Wars trilogy.

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Darth Talon is a Twi’lek Sith Lady created for the Star Wars: Legacy comic series (check out her Wookieepedia entry).


Here are some concept arts from The Art of Star Wars: The Force Awakens.

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George Lucas wanted a recluse Luke to train a female hero in Episode VII, as shown in those concept arts

From Slashfilm:

“Before Disney had acquired Lucasfilm on October 30, 2012, George Lucas himself wrote a treatment for a new trilogy of Star Wars movies. We’ve chronicled in the past how those story treatments were largely thrown out by director J.J. Abrams when he came on board the project on January 24, 2013. We will likely never find out what Lucas had planned for the Star Wars sequel trilogy, but the new Art of Star Wars: The Last Jedi book gives us one small peek at a George Lucas-approved Jedi Temple on the planet that later became known as Ahch-to. This is the closest we might ever come to seeing Lucas’ original vision for the sequel trilogy.

In the book, we learn that one of the first meetings to visualize The Force Awakens happened on January 16, 2013 at Skywalker Ranch with George Lucas himself. Among the pieces presented at the meeting were portraits of an older Luke Skywalker training a new disciple named Kira (who was later renamed Rey). The idea was that, 30 years after the fall of the Empire, Luke had gone to a dark place and secluded himself in a Jedi temple on a new planet. The paintings show Luke meditating, reassessing his whole life.

Apparently, the initial plan for Star Wars: Episode 7 was that Luke, over the course of that movie, would rediscover his vitality and train this new Jedi. So basically, what we got from the Rey/Luke storyline in The Last Jedi was initially supposed to be the bones for George Lucas’ Episode 7. Imagine an alternate universe where Episode 7 was Luke reluctantly training a new Jedi – it would be completely different. […]

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The Art of Star Wars: The Last Jedi features many of these old designs, including one of an old Luke standing next to structures that crumbled long ago. Another one features an ugly bell-shaped building that was approved by George Lucas before J.J. Abrams was even hired for The Force Awakens. You can see it above.

Here are some details:

“This was a very early take on Luke’s temple, way back when there was still no director. This artwork was shown to George Lucas in a presentation. Doug [Chiang] came back and said, “Congratulations, James. You got a George “Fabulouso” stamp.” VFX art director James Clyne recalls.

Adds Lucasfilm executive creative director Doug Chiang, “After working with George on the prequels for seven years, I knew in some ways how to anticipate what forms he would like – which is really good, because he still likes those forms. So for the Jedi temple, he loved that bell shape. It’s reminiscent of some of the imagery that [original Star Wars trilogy concept artist] Ralph McQuarrie painted way back.”

Some of these designs look very much like something from the prequels. One features Luke in heavy thought and another could depict a Sith Force ghost haunting him. You’ll have to buy the book to see them all, but here are a few noteworthy images:

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From reddit:

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George Lucas reportedly wanted Leia to be a trained Force-user in the sequel trilogy

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Mark Hamill: “This is something that always interested me because [Luke and Leia] can communicate telepathically and I tell her in one of the movies, I guess the third one, you have that power too. So I always wondered, and I don’t read the fanfiction, why she wouldn’t fully develop her Force sensibilities and I think that’s something George Lucas addressed in his original outline for VII, VIII and IX. I was talking to him last week, but they’re not following George’s ideas so we’ll have to wait and see on that one. But it seems like a waste of an innate talent that she should utilize in some way.”

Mark Hamill wishes Lucasfilm and Disney ‘had been more accepting of George Lucas’ guidance and advice’

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From Metro US:

“[…] Mark Hamill has now admitted that he is a little disappointed that Lucas is no longer involved, while also registering his disappointment that the powers that be over at the studio weren’t “more accepting of his guidance and advice.”

“What I wish is that they had been more accepting of his guidance and advice. Because he had an outline for ‘7,’ ‘8,’ and ‘9’. And it is vastly different to what they have done.”

But Hamill refused to overly attack Disney for their treatment of Lucas, instead insisting that their decision has clearly worked wonders because after the release of “The Force Awakens” and “Rogue One” the “Star Wars” franchise has never been more popular.

“But then again, I don’t want to be an old stick in the mud. There were the originals. There’s the prequels. But that’s all George. And now we have the next generation. And as far as I can see they are more popular than ever.” […]”


Mark Hamill played Luke Skywalker in Episodes IV through VIII.

CinemaBlend says it’s ‘necessary’ for the sequel trilogy to acknowledge the prequel era

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From CinemaBlend:

“The Star Wars Prequel Trilogy is unquestionably a divisive topic among the space opera franchise’s fans, but whether you love those movies or hate them, they’re still important to the saga of the galaxy far, far away. As the backstory of how Anakin Skywalker turned to the dark side and became Darth Vader was revealed, these three movies significantly expanded to the mythology of this universe, adding more flavor to not just the cinematic series, but the novels, comic books, video games and more. But Revenge of the Sith concluded this Star Wars era in 2005, and more than a decade later, we’re now in the midst of both another main trilogy and standalone Anthology spinoffs being released every other year. Recently, however, Star Wars: Episode IX director J.J. Abrams and writer Chris Terrio reportedly said that Episode IX will be infused with “thematic” Prequel elements. That’s a good decision, because it’s necessary to acknowledge this era of Star Wars history, no matter how polarizing it is.

[…] The events of this time period were important, particularly the Clone Wars conflict that ravaged the galaxy between Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith, and paved the way for the Empire’s rise. Even though that all happened half a century ago when the new trilogy unfolds, the consequences of that era left an indescribable impact on this galaxy.

Obviously not everything that from the prequels was added to the Star Wars canon was great, and there are some elements that are better left gathering dust in the proverbial corner. For instance, I doubt we’ll ever hear about midichlorians again. Still, it’s one thing for the current trilogy to maintain connections to the first Star Wars movies, but to ignore the Prequel period entirely is a disservice to the franchise. Obviously the main focus should be making Episode IX a great story, but if J.J. Abrams and Chris Terrio can do that and effectively pay tribute to a period of Star Wars history that (from our perspective) only ended a little over a decade ago, then so much the better.

Of course, it remains to be seen what these Prequel elements in Episode IX will actually be. They could be something as minor as seeing a few starships from that era (I’m partial to the Naboo straighter) or hearing about Old Republic politics, to something major like a new droid army or clone operatives being activated by The First Order or The Resistance. […]”

There will be a Star Wars Marathon Event featuring all eight Episodes on December 14

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From StarWars.com:

Star Wars: The Last Jedi arrives December 15, continuing the epic story of Rey, Kylo Ren, and the struggle between the Resistance and the First Order. StarWars.com is thrilled to announce a galaxy of ticket offers, special events, and giveaways in celebration of the highly-anticipated film’s release:

Opening Night Events

Star Wars fans will have multiple ways to celebrate the upcoming release of Star Wars: The Last Jedi. On Thursday, December 14, ahead of its official opening on December 15, fans can be among the first to see the film by attending one of three events: An Opening Night Fan Event. A Star Wars: The Force Awakens andStar Wars: The Last Jedi Double Feature. Or, a Star Wars Marathon featuring all eight movies in one epic journey. These premium events will include exclusive content, Star Wars collectible cards, and a special concession offer. Plus, Star Wars: The Last Jedi will start at 6 p.m. local time, one hour earlier than regular public show times. […]”

George Lucas reportedly wanted Han Solo to die in Episode VII

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From GQ:

“[Harrison] Ford’s least expected late-career reprise was his return to the world of Star Wars. “I was surprised,” he concedes. The first call came from George Lucas. “It was proposed that I might make another appearance as Han Solo. And I think it was mentioned, even in the first call, that he would not survive. That’s something I’d been arguing for for some period of time”—Ford had unsuccessfully lobbied for Solo to die in Return of the Jedi in 1983—“so I said okay.”

Was that a necessity for you to be involved?

“Not necessarily. But it was, you know, an interesting development of the character.”
This year Ford attended his first Star Wars “Celebration” fan event, in commemoration of the first film’s 40th anniversary. “I was asked to make an appearance and I did,” he says, as though only the want of an invitation has kept him away until now. He appeared on a panel with Lucas, and I was surprised to watch Ford bring up his famous criticism of the director’s clunky dialogue right to his face: “You can type this shit, but you can’t say it.”

Lucas doesn’t get offended by that?

Ford laughs, as if this has never really crossed his mind. “I don’t think so. He sold the company for, you know, $4 billion. He doesn’t give a shit what I think.” Ford reminisces about the first time he shared this opinion on the Star Wars set. “George usually sits near a monitor, far removed, so I had to convey my impression…or my feelings…about the dialogue across a great space. So I did shout it. ‘George! You can type this shit, but you sure can’t say it! Move your mouth when you’re typing!’ But it was a joke, at the time. A stress-relieving joke.”


Reminder: Lucas wrote a treatment for Episode VII before leaving Lucasfilm, but only a few ideas remained.