“The ultimate Star Wars 40th anniversary fan art” by James Raiz

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From io9:

“We’ve all seen a lot of Star Wars fan art over the years, yes? Well, you’ve never seen anything like this. This is basically all of it put together in one big, beautiful image.

What you see above is just a piece of a 15-foot Star Wars mural by artist James Raiz. It combines all the characters from the first seven episodes of the Star Wars saga, as well as Rogue One, and took 450 hours spread over seven months to create. Here are a few other looks.

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[…] Want to see more? Raiz also created a few videos to get into the making of the piece, as well as its details. ”

 

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George Lucas wanted Darth Talon to corrupt Han and Leia’s son in Episode VII

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Lucasfilm Development Exec Pablo Hidalgo shared more information about George Lucas’ treatments for the third Star Wars trilogy.

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Darth Talon is a Twi’lek Sith Lady created for the Star Wars: Legacy comic series (check out her Wookieepedia entry).


Here are some concept arts from The Art of Star Wars: The Force Awakens.

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George Lucas wanted a recluse Luke to train a female hero in Episode VII, as shown in those concept arts

From Slashfilm:

“Before Disney had acquired Lucasfilm on October 30, 2012, George Lucas himself wrote a treatment for a new trilogy of Star Wars movies. We’ve chronicled in the past how those story treatments were largely thrown out by director J.J. Abrams when he came on board the project on January 24, 2013. We will likely never find out what Lucas had planned for the Star Wars sequel trilogy, but the new Art of Star Wars: The Last Jedi book gives us one small peek at a George Lucas-approved Jedi Temple on the planet that later became known as Ahch-to. This is the closest we might ever come to seeing Lucas’ original vision for the sequel trilogy.

In the book, we learn that one of the first meetings to visualize The Force Awakens happened on January 16, 2013 at Skywalker Ranch with George Lucas himself. Among the pieces presented at the meeting were portraits of an older Luke Skywalker training a new disciple named Kira (who was later renamed Rey). The idea was that, 30 years after the fall of the Empire, Luke had gone to a dark place and secluded himself in a Jedi temple on a new planet. The paintings show Luke meditating, reassessing his whole life.

Apparently, the initial plan for Star Wars: Episode 7 was that Luke, over the course of that movie, would rediscover his vitality and train this new Jedi. So basically, what we got from the Rey/Luke storyline in The Last Jedi was initially supposed to be the bones for George Lucas’ Episode 7. Imagine an alternate universe where Episode 7 was Luke reluctantly training a new Jedi – it would be completely different. […]

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The Art of Star Wars: The Last Jedi features many of these old designs, including one of an old Luke standing next to structures that crumbled long ago. Another one features an ugly bell-shaped building that was approved by George Lucas before J.J. Abrams was even hired for The Force Awakens. You can see it above.

Here are some details:

“This was a very early take on Luke’s temple, way back when there was still no director. This artwork was shown to George Lucas in a presentation. Doug [Chiang] came back and said, “Congratulations, James. You got a George “Fabulouso” stamp.” VFX art director James Clyne recalls.

Adds Lucasfilm executive creative director Doug Chiang, “After working with George on the prequels for seven years, I knew in some ways how to anticipate what forms he would like – which is really good, because he still likes those forms. So for the Jedi temple, he loved that bell shape. It’s reminiscent of some of the imagery that [original Star Wars trilogy concept artist] Ralph McQuarrie painted way back.”

Some of these designs look very much like something from the prequels. One features Luke in heavy thought and another could depict a Sith Force ghost haunting him. You’ll have to buy the book to see them all, but here are a few noteworthy images:

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From reddit:

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Mark Hamill wishes Lucasfilm and Disney ‘had been more accepting of George Lucas’ guidance and advice’

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From Metro US:

“[…] Mark Hamill has now admitted that he is a little disappointed that Lucas is no longer involved, while also registering his disappointment that the powers that be over at the studio weren’t “more accepting of his guidance and advice.”

“What I wish is that they had been more accepting of his guidance and advice. Because he had an outline for ‘7,’ ‘8,’ and ‘9’. And it is vastly different to what they have done.”

But Hamill refused to overly attack Disney for their treatment of Lucas, instead insisting that their decision has clearly worked wonders because after the release of “The Force Awakens” and “Rogue One” the “Star Wars” franchise has never been more popular.

“But then again, I don’t want to be an old stick in the mud. There were the originals. There’s the prequels. But that’s all George. And now we have the next generation. And as far as I can see they are more popular than ever.” […]”


Mark Hamill played Luke Skywalker in Episodes IV through VIII.

George Lucas reportedly wanted Han Solo to die in Episode VII

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From GQ:

“[Harrison] Ford’s least expected late-career reprise was his return to the world of Star Wars. “I was surprised,” he concedes. The first call came from George Lucas. “It was proposed that I might make another appearance as Han Solo. And I think it was mentioned, even in the first call, that he would not survive. That’s something I’d been arguing for for some period of time”—Ford had unsuccessfully lobbied for Solo to die in Return of the Jedi in 1983—“so I said okay.”

Was that a necessity for you to be involved?

“Not necessarily. But it was, you know, an interesting development of the character.”
This year Ford attended his first Star Wars “Celebration” fan event, in commemoration of the first film’s 40th anniversary. “I was asked to make an appearance and I did,” he says, as though only the want of an invitation has kept him away until now. He appeared on a panel with Lucas, and I was surprised to watch Ford bring up his famous criticism of the director’s clunky dialogue right to his face: “You can type this shit, but you can’t say it.”

Lucas doesn’t get offended by that?

Ford laughs, as if this has never really crossed his mind. “I don’t think so. He sold the company for, you know, $4 billion. He doesn’t give a shit what I think.” Ford reminisces about the first time he shared this opinion on the Star Wars set. “George usually sits near a monitor, far removed, so I had to convey my impression…or my feelings…about the dialogue across a great space. So I did shout it. ‘George! You can type this shit, but you sure can’t say it! Move your mouth when you’re typing!’ But it was a joke, at the time. A stress-relieving joke.”


Reminder: Lucas wrote a treatment for Episode VII before leaving Lucasfilm, but only a few ideas remained.

Lucasfilm still doesn’t intend to release The Making of Star Wars: The Force Awakens

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Michael Siglain is creative director at Lucasfilm Publishing.


J. W. Rinzler’s The Making of Star Wars: The Force Awakens was initially scheduled for release in October 2016, but Lucasfilm eventually canceled it. The book was to reveal some of George Lucas’ original ideas for the sequel trilogy.

J. W. Rinzler won’t continue his blog about “the rise and fall of Star Wars”

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J. W. Rinzler just announced he would not continue his blog about “the rise and fall of Star Wars”. The blog was already shut down for a few days.

Rinzler initially intended to blog about his time at Lucasfilm up to the release of The Force Awakens. The blog’s last entry went behind the scenes of the filming of Revenge of the Sith.

No reason was given for the closing of the blog for now.

As a reminder, some of our previous articles relayed some excerpts of the blog.


J. W. Rinzler used to be a writer and editor at Lucas Licensing. He wrote The Making of Star Wars Revenge of the SithThe Art of Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith,  and many other behind-the-scenes books.