The design for the Mandalorian capital stems from a George Lucas idea

From Star Wars Rebels – Heroes of Mandalore Trivia Gallery:

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“The design for Sundari, the Mandalorian capital, stems from George Lucas’ suggestion of using a trackball mouse as a starting point during the city’s development in Star Wars: The Clone Wars.”

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Star Wars author Saladin Ahmed said ‘George Lucas can suck my d*** for making turbo-racist s***’

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UPDATE : Saladin Ahmed deleted his tweet.

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Note: he was discussing Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom.


In case you missed it, Ahmed also accused the Star Wars Prequels of racism.


Saladin Ahmed is one of the authors of the upcoming book Star Wars: Canto Bight.

40 screenwriters ranked George Lucas 16th best screenwriter of all time

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From Vulture:

““To make a good film,” Alfred Hitchcock once said, “you need three things: the script, the script, and the script.” Yet while it’s easy to find (and argue over) lists of the greatest films ever, it’s difficult to find a list of the greatest screenwriters. We decided to remedy that — by polling more than 40 of today’s top screenwriters on which of their predecessors (and contemporaries) they consider to be the best. To compile such a list is to pose a question: What is the essence of the screenwriter’s art? Plot? Dialogue? Character? All that and more? We left that judgment to those who know best — the writers. Here are their selections (ranked in order of popularity, with ties broken by us), and representative testimonials for each. […]

16. George Lucas

Notable Scripts: American Graffiti (1973), Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope (1977), Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989), Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones (2002)
Oscars: Best Original Screenplay, American Graffiti; Best Original Screenplay, Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope.

Dialogue isn’t everything. For proof, look no further than the career of George Lucas, for whom human speech has served as an occasional stumbling block. Alec Guinness spent the bulk of his time on Star Wars complaining that his lines were “rubbish,” while Harrison Ford famously told Lucas, “You can type this shit, but you can’t say it.” No matter. A few clunky lines didn’t stop Lucas from dreaming up one of the most alluring and enduring universes in the history of cinema. In marrying the aesthetics of the pulp serials of his youth to formal lessons gleaned from Joseph Campbell, he quite literally created the template for 40-plus years of blockbusters. But his legacy isn’t limited to space operas. “Yes, the man created Star Wars, but want to see another side of his skills? Check out American Graffiti and weep because you’ll never be as talented as he is,” says Andrea Berloff.”

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Video: The Filmmaker’s Voice – George Lucas

From Alejandro Villarreal@Alamo City:

“Should a man’s life be defined by Jar Jar Binks? George Lucas is not a perfect filmmaker. But he is a genius. A genius who is able to communicate the best and worst of our common nature, and has done so in an unprecedented, universal cinematic language. Few have been able to equal his artistic success, because frankly, he makes it look easy.

I made this video essay to provide a window into the mind of a socially conscious filmmaker who is explored ideas about our common existence and tried to present them to in new, interesting ways to audiences. His goal was never to make an escapist film solely for the special effects and explosions, but it was to give his audiences a greater understanding of our shared humanity.

True, he sometimes fell short. “Attack of the Clones” is a bit weird, to be sure. But he was always true to himself, his voice and his stories. All this to say: I would rather watch a flawed movie by an imperfect genius than a movie made by a voiceless committee.”

George Lucas reportedly wanted Han Solo to die in Episode VII

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From GQ:

“[Harrison] Ford’s least expected late-career reprise was his return to the world of Star Wars. “I was surprised,” he concedes. The first call came from George Lucas. “It was proposed that I might make another appearance as Han Solo. And I think it was mentioned, even in the first call, that he would not survive. That’s something I’d been arguing for for some period of time”—Ford had unsuccessfully lobbied for Solo to die in Return of the Jedi in 1983—“so I said okay.”

Was that a necessity for you to be involved?

“Not necessarily. But it was, you know, an interesting development of the character.”
This year Ford attended his first Star Wars “Celebration” fan event, in commemoration of the first film’s 40th anniversary. “I was asked to make an appearance and I did,” he says, as though only the want of an invitation has kept him away until now. He appeared on a panel with Lucas, and I was surprised to watch Ford bring up his famous criticism of the director’s clunky dialogue right to his face: “You can type this shit, but you can’t say it.”

Lucas doesn’t get offended by that?

Ford laughs, as if this has never really crossed his mind. “I don’t think so. He sold the company for, you know, $4 billion. He doesn’t give a shit what I think.” Ford reminisces about the first time he shared this opinion on the Star Wars set. “George usually sits near a monitor, far removed, so I had to convey my impression…or my feelings…about the dialogue across a great space. So I did shout it. ‘George! You can type this shit, but you sure can’t say it! Move your mouth when you’re typing!’ But it was a joke, at the time. A stress-relieving joke.”


Reminder: Lucas wrote a treatment for Episode VII before leaving Lucasfilm, but only a few ideas remained.

Mashable supports the idea of George Lucas directing Episode IX

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From Mashable:

“In August 1977, an unusually jaunty George Lucas gave an interview to Rolling Stone about his surprise summer blockbuster, Star Wars. He was full of ideas for what to do with his newfound wealth; he’d just funded a comic shop that sold original art, and was mulling a store that sold burgers and diabetic ice cream.

How about more Star Wars movies? Eh. He’d let friends like Steven Spielberg direct the next ones, Lucas said. He was only interested in directing the closing chapter in the Skywalker saga, which at the time he imagined would run to about 9 episodes.

“I want to do the last one,” Lucas said, “so I can do one twice as good as everyone else.”

When the director of Star Wars Episode IX, Colin Treverrow, was dumped by Lucasfilm Tuesday, I tweeted Lucas’ 1977 quote as if he were throwing his hat in the ring through a time warp. A surprising number of fans were into the idea.

Even after the controversy over the prequels, a surprising number of fans are into the idea of the Creator returning to save his franchise in its hour of need, fulfilling his 40-year-old prophecy.

Cool your jets, flyboys.

There are some very good reasons why this 72-year-old would not want the job of directing Episode IX — even though there’s one big reason why he should. […]

As a storyteller like Lucas knows, the idea of a redemption arc is profoundly compelling.

A younger generation of fans is already reclaiming the prequels via Reddit memes, proving the internet isn’t such a hostile place after all. If Lucas came back for Episode IX and gave us a movie as widely loved and critically acclaimed as The Force Awakens or Rogue One, he would secure his legacy and wipe over memories of the prequels tearing fandom apart.

Would he want to bring Jar Jar Binks back as a bit player? Maybe so — but he could also take some pride in filming the satisfyingly tragic end to the Binks narrative that we’ve recently seen in the world of Star Wars novels.

And for a guy who made the prequels revolve around a prophecy of “bringing balance to the Force,” there would no doubt be tremendous satisfaction in fulfilling his own prediction from four decades ago that he would direct the last sequel and make it “twice as good.”

Will Episode IX be the last? As far as Lucasfilm is concerned, it currently is; Kennedy has said the company is considering making each Star Wars film beyond that a standalone in the style of Rogue One or the upcoming Han Solo film.

We could see the continuing adventures of Rey and friends without making it an episode in the Skywalker saga — especially as it looks increasingly likely that she’s no Skywalker. Besides, Lucasfilm is kind of done with that Roman numeral numbering system, as shown by the fact that neither Episode VII nor Episode VIII were marketed with that title.

Han Solo is dead. Leia Organa, the late Carrie Fisher, will get her swan song in The Last Jedi. The only original trilogy hero likely left for Episode IX is Luke Skywalker. And who better to bring his story to completion than the guy who put himself into the character in the first place?

Think of it, the last scenes with Luke S. directed by Lucas. Talk about dropping the mic.”

 

George Lucas still offers some advice to Kathleen Kennedy on the Star Wars universe

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From Entertainment Weekly:

“Despite his retirement, the godfather of Star Wars still weighs in occasionally about the new films.

And George Lucas has one main area of interest: the Jedi.

Since The Last Jedi will take fans on a journey to the primitive first temple of the Force-wielding order, it seems like a good time to revisit a comment Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy made to EW at this year’s Star Wars Celebration.

Kennedy, who has known and worked with Lucas since their Raiders of the Lost Ark days, was asked if he still offers input into the films and stories being developed.

“Not really,” she said. “But he’ll whisper in my ear every now and then. Usually it’s something specific or important to him about Jedi training. Things like that.” […]

Lucas, who sold his company to Disney in a $4 billion deal in 2012, has occasionally visited the sets of the films, but Rogue One director Gareth Edwards said his suggestions were limited to jokes and encouragement to not “screw up.” 

Although his original story treatments for where the saga might go have gone largely unused, Kennedy said some of the broader ideas are still providing the foundation, like handing off the heroism to a new group of characters.

“I think he’s starting to settle into this and just be a fan,” she said. “It’s taken a while. It’s hard to let go, after 40 years. That’s a lot of expectation and things he thought a lot about. Suddenly that next generation, that whole thematic idea he came up with, is in process.””